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Black Westchester Goes to MVHS Career Day by MVHS Student Ambassador Zoe Roswell

Career Day gives students a shot at participating in extraordinary things like me, one of the ambassadors, getting a chance to write an article for Black Westchester

Black Westchester Magazine’s Publisher Damon K. Jones & his student Ambassador Jason Perlaza at Mount Vernon High School Career Day [Black Westchester]

Mount Vernon High School held its 10th annual career day, on Frida, April 7th.  Student ambassadors, who are members of the school’s National Honor Society, escorted various professionals around the building and into classrooms where they spoke to students about the fields they work in.


“Career day was a very opportunity-filled day,” Junior Jaciara De Souza said about Career Day. “Having presenters that were motivational caused a student to be filled with encouragement to be successful in life.”

The morning began in the high school’s community room where the ambassadors welcomed the presenters. Before a few words from school counselor and National Honor Society advisor, Ms. Peggy Williams, and the school’s principal, Ronald Gonzalez, marked the beginning of the day, the ambassadors sat down with their assigned presenters and discussed their careers.

While this was going on in the community room in the school’s Little Theater, a group of students were listening from law professionals. Senior and Mount Vernon High School Class of 2017 Salutatorian Bryce Kennedy escorted Westchester District Attorney Anthony A. Scarpino Jr. (An MVHS alum) and members from his office.

“They all had wonderful things to say and gave spectacular career advice to the students. [Chief Criminal Investigator] Matthew Tormey’s words resonated with me the most. He said that one must seek to understand first before making any sort of assumption.”

There was an array of professionals in attendance including an engineer from Google, members of the US Army and even well-known music manager Mr. Michael “Blue” Williams.

A student in one of the classes, Quinten Snell, spoke about what he took away from seeing his presenter Michael “Blue” Williams. “Well I always wanted to know what life was like behind the scenes in the music industry and so when Blue explained the hard work and sacrifices that were made in this field it really opened up my eyes to how I have to be willing to make sacrifices if I want to get where I’m going.”

“Well I always wanted to know what life was like behind the scenes in the music industry and so when Blue explained the hard work and sacrifices that were made in this field it really opened up my eyes to how I have to be willing to make sacrifices if I want to get where I’m going.”

The 95th chapter of the National Honor Society is discussing the effects of discrimination this year and presenters were encouraged to talk about any discriminatory circumstances they themselves have gone through in their profession.

Senior William Phillips was with Stance Mason for the day. Mason is a principal technician at Global Foundries. “Alumni, Stance Mason, has really impacted some of the youth in Mount Vernon High School. Throughout the day he mentored students by conversing with them whether they were in class or roaming the halls. He gave attention to students that everyone else tends to disregard.”

After the presenters were finished in the classrooms, they were escorted back into the community room for lunch. During lunch, most of the participants in the room weren’t solely eating but they were also networking. Presenters spoke to the student ambassadors as they ate providing them with insight into various fields. One speaker from the Navy explained that the military has a vast amount of jobs available in nearly any field. He gave the students a list of the jobs and his business card. Another professional, who works for the Westchester Medical Center, explained to the ambassadors that no matter if you left school with a 4.0 GPA or a GPA with a one in the front if you work hard at what you do you’ll get a good job.

Overall the day was a major success and extremely beneficial to the students of Mount Vernon High School. Getting the business card of someone in their desired profession can give students a shot at participating in extraordinary things. Things like me, one of the ambassadors, getting a chance to write an article for a magazine like Black Westchester because Mr. Woodson and Mr. Jones participated.

I wasn’t the only student who gained something from the men who run Black Westchester. Ayanna Armstrong who was in one of the classes where they spoke said “I learned that journalists are like music in a movie. We set the tone. Also I learned that the greatest weapon you can ever have is pen and paper.”


About The Author:

Zoe Roswell is a 17-year-old Mount Vernon High School Senior that aspires to be a journalist.

At MVHS, she is the president of the National Honor Society and the Ladies of Distinction. She enjoys creative writing and dreams of writing a novel that gets on the New York Times Best Sellers list.


 

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Black Westchester

Black Westchester - News With The Black Point Of View is an online news magazine for people of color for Westchester and the Tri- State area of New York at every economic level. Our mission is to promote the concept of “community” through media.
Black Westchester
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About Black Westchester (642 Articles)
Black Westchester - News With The Black Point Of View is an online news magazine for people of color for Westchester and the Tri- State area of New York at every economic level. Our mission is to promote the concept of “community” through media.

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